A color-changing bandage may just change how we treat infections. -
3691
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-3691,single-format-standard,qode-quick-links-1.0,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-theme-ver-11.2,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.1.1,vc_responsive
 

A color-changing bandage may just change how we treat infections.

A color-changing bandage may just change how we treat infections.

Did you know that more than 300 kids in the United States are sent to the hospital every single day due to burn injuries? Yes, that’s completely true.

Antibiotics are often part of routine burn treatment — even if the kids don’t need them. We’ve all had experiences like this. It can take up to two days for a doctor to diagnose an infection, so we’re given antibiotics as a “just to be safe” measure … even if our injury isn’t infected.

As a result, antibiotic resistance is now considered one of the biggest health threats we face today.

Overusing antibiotics can cause high levels of antibiotic resistance — making infections and injuries become severely difficult to get rid of in the future.

Lucky for us, brilliant scientists were able to invent a very innovative bandage that promises to help doctors cut down on doling out unnecessary antibiotics.

It’s all about what turns neon green.

Developed by scientists at the University of Bath, this bandage-of-the-future is a special medical dressing that can determine if a wound becomes infected and get results faster than anything else out there today.

The so-called “best bandage ever” uses UV light to provide the answers people need almost immediately. This can save millions of lives!

These bandages contain nanocapsules that contain a dye that bursts open in the presence of disease-causing bacteria. Bright green = infection.

The test on the right means that the wound has an infection.

For young kids and their weak immune systems, two days untreated can become a dangerous situation when dealing with infection — or not.

“Children are at particular risk of serious infection from even a small burn,” explained Dr. Amber Young. “However, with current methods clinicians can’t tell whether a sick child might have a raised temperature due to a serious bacterial burn wound infection, or just from a simple cough or cold.

But with the arrival of these nanocapsule bandages, the future is now; an infection diagnosis is possible within just a few hours, giving doctors the green light to act fast and know exactly what steps are necessary.

This breakthrough can help put families at ease, cut down on hospital costs, and limit the use of unnecessary antibiotics – which has turned into a serious problem.

There’s a reason the World Health Organization has launched its first-ever World Antibiotic Resistance Week. If we’re not careful, common infections that have been easily treatable in the past will come back to cause some major problems.

 

What do you think of this amazing innovation for the medical industry? Share this post to your friends and family on Facebook!